when i find myself in times of trouble
remus lupin comes to me
speaking words of wisdom

(Source: voldermorte)

ibelieveinthilbo:

the—fandom—has—claimed—me:

ropunzel:

brigwife:

borrowed-blue-box:

REALLY, AGAIN? THE FUCKING REBLOG BUTTON WASRIGHTTHEREJESUS CRUST

jesus crust


this post is a mess

That is a tortilla. Tortillas do not have crusts.

ibelieveinthilbo:

the—fandom—has—claimed—me:

ropunzel:

brigwife:

borrowed-blue-box:

REALLY, AGAIN? THE FUCKING REBLOG BUTTON WAS
RIGHT
THERE
JESUS CRUST

jesus crust

image

this post is a mess

That is a tortilla. Tortillas do not have crusts.

fuckyeahblackwidow:

Captain America: The Winter Soldier, deleted scene.

(Source: teenlittlehorrorstory)

Tomato & Red Lentil Soup

no-more-ramen:

Tomato & Red Lentil Soup

The finished soup with a dollop of greek yogurt and a castelvetrano olive

For the last several months, this soup has been a staple in my kitchen. This recipe is versatile, easy to master, and extremely healthy! It only takes 20 minutes to cook and one small bowl leaves you satisfied.

Servings: 6
Total time: 25 minutes

Tomato & Red Lentil Soup

This recipe was inspired by Heidi Swanson’s Red Lentil Soup. After my first time cooking it, I decided to drop a couple small tomatoes in, as well as some sage and thyme from my garden. The result was amazing — one of my favorite soups of all time. Red lentils are an awesome superfood. 1.5 cups of lentils contain 75g of protein, 89g dietary fiber, plus iron, magnesium, and essential amino acids[1]. This means each small bowl of soup has 12.5g of protein.

This recipe is great to experiment with, and I’ve made it with tofu, carrots, and eggplant (on three separate occasions). If you’re adding another protein, add it at the same stage as the onions and be sure to add more broth so it doesn’t get too thick. This time, I used a single bay leaf in lieu of fresh herbs. Strong herbs are best added near the beginning of the soup so the flavors can mull.

Ingredients:

  • 1½ cups red lentils (rinsed and picked over for pebbles etc.)
  • ¼ cup rice (I used short grain white rice)
  • 1 big tomato or 3 small tomatoes
  • 1 onion, sliced
  • ¼ cup dry white wine
  • 3 tbsp dried chili flakes (I used Aleppo and Marash chile flakes)
  • 1 tbsp minced garlic
  • 1 tbsp grated ginger
  • Salt to taste, about 2 tbsp
  • Lots of pepper (I used Black Penja peppercorns)
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 2 tbsp olive oil
  • 5 cups broth (I used a vegetable buillon cube and an MSG-free dashi fish broth packet)

Tomato & Red Lentil Soup

Clockwise from left: Bay leaf, Aleppo Chili flakes, Penja black peppercorns, and Hawaiian Sea Salt

Garnishes:

  • castelvetrano olive
  • greek yogurt
  • a drizzle of good olive oil (I use Stonehouse)
  • a pinch of coarse sea salt (I used Hawaiian Sea Salt)

Other garnishes I’ve tried are capers, sour cream, fried egg, soft boiled egg, and a squeeze of lime. Another variation is the spice — if you have Doenjang (Korean red bean paste), put it in near the end of browning the onions or it will burn. Be sure to use less than 3 tbsp to maintain the same spice level (I’d call it medium). If you are using dry chilis, put them in at the beginning to extract the spices into the oil. I recommend grinding up an insane amount of black pepper — about half a grinder’s worth. For the ultimate pepper flavor, don’t grind your peppercorns. Put them in whole and let them simmer in the soup so you can chomp down on them later. For extra protein, add a tablespoon of chia seeds.

Directions:

  1. Chop onion and place in a big soup pan with some olive oil. To avoid onion tears I wear gloves, cut by the sink, and rinse the cutting board immediately after placing onions in the pot. Chop off the ends of the onion first (the onion’s basal plate) and then peel, halve, and chop quickly.
  2. Heat soup pot on medium heat.
  3. Add garlic, ginger, chili flakes, herbs and peppercorns if using.
  4. Stir for 5 minutes or so until just before the onions start to brown.
  5. If using chili paste, remove pot from heat and stir the paste in.
  6. Add white wine and stir.
  7. Pour in broth.
  8. Bring to a boil. While waiting, stir in salt and pepper.
  9. Once the broth boils, reduce heat to a simmer.
  10. Slowly pour in tomatoes, lentils, rice, and chia seeds if using.
  11. Simmer for at least 20 minutes, stirring every 5 minutes or so.
  12. After 20 minutes, taste to make sure the lentils have broken down. Season with more salt and pepper if needed.
  13. Once the soup gets to desired thickness, spoon into bowls and top with dairy, olives or capers, a drizzle of olive oil, and a pinch of sea salt.

Notes:

[1] USDA National Nutrient Database

[2] Nutrition Research Vol 18, Issue 4 (1998)

annejamison:

sphinxyvic:

lisalisa007:

thebicker:

foxy-green:

bencarignan:

rickybrugal:

dorkly:

Female Fantasy III

Perfecto.

perfect

May they be forever alone for their elitist douche-baggery.

I was recently interviewing the woman who founded Her Universe and we were talking specifically about women and geekdom. I asked about the rise of girls in geek culture and she very accurately corrected me: There is no “rise” of geek girls. We’ve always been here. Girls are just as nerdy as dudes are. Ladies have always been interested in sci fi and fantasy and video games - we just don’t talk about it a lot because men are assholes. 

I can show you my Star Wars figures from 1977.  I played the heck out of them.  And my original trilogy on VHS.  And my Lego R2D2 and Yoda …

I had a crush on Mr. Spock when I was 10.

I had a crush on Mr. Spock when I was 6, you total n00b, you fake Spock geek…oh wait, never mind. Cool! Me too! 

micdotcom:

One chart says it all about the government and female bodies 

We’re only halfway through 2014, and state legislators have already introduced a whopping 468 restrictions intended to limit, control or otherwise regulate women’s reproductive rights.
How many comparable bills have been introduced to regulate men’s reproductive health care during this period? Zero. 
Something’s very wrong with this picture.
What would restricting male reproductive rights even look like? | Follow micdotcom

micdotcom:

One chart says it all about the government and female bodies 

We’re only halfway through 2014, and state legislators have already introduced a whopping 468 restrictions intended to limit, control or otherwise regulate women’s reproductive rights.

How many comparable bills have been introduced to regulate men’s reproductive health care during this period? Zero. 

Something’s very wrong with this picture.

What would restricting male reproductive rights even look like? | Follow micdotcom

chaseross:

twoandtwentyonebee:

drarna:

asking for straight pride is like asking for able bodied parking spaces

thats a really good comparison because there are about seventy able bodied parking spaces to one disabled and able bodied people still insist on using the ones that arent theirs

this is seriously a great post 

(Source: neptunain)

titaniumbovine:

LOOK AT THE LITTLE GREY ONE
YOU’RE THE ODD ONE OUT BUT IT’S OKAY YOU’RE GORGEOUS

titaniumbovine:

LOOK AT THE LITTLE GREY ONE

YOU’RE THE ODD ONE OUT BUT IT’S OKAY YOU’RE GORGEOUS

wantstobelieve:

#i’m glad someone cracked the window for the puppy

(Source: arsonist01)

thefrogman:

Scott DeWitt [webcomic | tumblr | twitter]

thefrogman:

Scott DeWitt [webcomic | tumblr | twitter]

foxglovesandfairies:

This dork tho.

foxglovesandfairies:

This dork tho.

heilbucky:

heilbucky:

WHY DOES NO ONE UPDATE THEIR FANFICTION. I'M ABOUT TO WRITE MY OWN FUCKING FANFICTION BECAUSE NOBODY UPDATES. *cries silently*

Anonymous

booasaur:

tersaseda:

peaceheather:

starrizlightning:

mildredandbobbin:

snapslikethis:

I am probably the wrong person to ask this, anon, because I don’t have much sympathy for this type of complaint.

I’m going to gently (but not too gently) correct the mistaken assumption you have that authors owe you fanfiction in what you perceive to be a timely manner.

Let me tell you, as a fanfiction author, that I wish I could give you all a new one-shot every other day and a multi-chap update every week.

I know many others who wish the same, but can’t.

Because, you know, we have lives.

Real lives. Like in the real world. With real commitments - school to graduate, jobs to go to, both of which we need our sleep for. We have families and boyfriends who demand (and deserve) our time and attention. We have sports teams we may be committed to, projects we’re involved in, or organizations we ally our time and resources with.

And sometimes, an author may have a free day and just wants to sleep in.

Because fanfiction writing is a hobby.

A cathartic and fun one, yes, but a hobby just the same. 

And as such, that hobby, therapeutic and fun though it may be, doesn’t get first priority. Or second. Or third. Or sometimes fourth.

I’ve known one author who basically left the fandom because of the pressure to update quickly and how aggravating that sense of entitlement, I know another who almost left, but didn’t, aun I see asks for the big fandom authors (Jules and BC) weekly asking when will you update? next chapter? how far along are you? spoilers?

For the most part, authors are all super gracious and kind. Because no fanfiction author is hoarding a completed chapter and deliberately withholding it to be mean. Readers are awesome and bringing happiness to someone else’s day-that’s the best compliment, right?

But to get an anon asking where in the hell the update is….that doesn’t help at all. It actually sucks the joy out of writing. And when there’s no joy, it usually—well, it usually sucks.

I’m not telling you how to feel about the subject, but really?

Please, do go write a fanfic. Come up with a plot or a concept, write a rough draft to flesh it out, edit it, maybe rewrite it, find a beta and send it to them, get it back, look at their suggested changes versus your suggested changes, edit it again, send it back to the beta again, maybe scratch entire scene or plotline,  make sure your characters are in character and saying and doing the things they ought to be doing in a way that makes sense and is also compelling to read. Do all that, and post them and maybe get no reviews, or bad reviews. And do it again anyway, because you enjoy doing it.

But you will very quickly see how long it takes—how involved the process can get—because most of the people I know want to want to post work they are proud of, work that takes effort, and can’t (and shouldn’t) be whipped up overnight.

In terms of word count-a hundred thousand words-which is what most multi-chapter fics are-those take real time authors, who do it for a living as their primary income, months and years to complete. And that’s with a fleshed out concept, dedicated time to complete it, and an editor to help the process along.

Your favorite author may be stressing about finals, or working on the third draft of a chapter that just isn’t coming together right, or god forbid, having a relaxing day in the sun.

Like that’s her choice and she will post it when she can and she probably wants it posted, too.

So patience, dear. Have some patience. And go write a oneshot.

You know what’s more encouraging to an author then ‘when’s the next chapter’ or ‘update quicker!’ - leaving positive feedback about what you liked about the last chapter or the story as a whole (be specific!) - because sometimes the author is having a long dark tea time of the soul and just seeing a reminder of what’s good about their story can help them remember why they were excited about writing the story in the first place, and feel enthused enough to get back into it.

image

As a writer, I am an unabashed review whore. I don’t mean that I will blackmail readers and say stupid crap like “I will post the next chapter once I get ten reviews!” because that’s childish and manipulative. But I do mean that a good review can make my whole week and will definitely encourage me to write more and write faster. It’s a reward feedback system, pure and simple. I write, you review, I get a little ting! of pleasure, I want to write more and get more reward. I get insecure when I don’t see a lot of reviews, even though I know it could just be a lack of traffic or a small fandom, or the middle of a holiday when none of the usual readers are around to actually look at my work. I crave those reviews.

As a reader, therefore, I’ve decided it’s only fair to leave the sort of reviews that I personally would love to see on my own fics. I don’t just say, “nice chapter!” although that can certainly be part of it. I try to say things like, “oh MAN, the suspense here is killing me and I can’t wait to see how you resolve it, i love love love the way this character just completely shot down that other character who was being a jerk, it was perfect and way overdue for that jerk,” and so on.

^^^^All of this.

Seriously. I’ve read so much fic but only recently started leaving feedback, partly because I followed so many writers on tumblr and saw how the reviews (or the lack thereof) affected them, and partly because I occasionally post photosets myself and like going through tags, however mild or incoherent, so I somewhat understood that feeling. And that’s not even a fair comparison, photosets usually take not nearly the effort that goes into stories, but tend to get reblogged and shared with such a wide audience so quickly.

So after realizing what I appreciated about the tags, and why they seemed so much easier for people to add, and putting that together with what the various authors I followed said, I realized that a review wasn’t nearly the Big Deal that I was making it out to be.

Not leaving comments had nothing to do with laziness and everything to do with my own fear of making a bad impression, of bothering the writer somehow (I know!), of not leaving as thoughtful a comment as the fic/writer deserved, of being unoriginal. Yeah, forget all that.

There are authors who love interacting with their regular readers and who get into analytical discussions with them, and maybe you’re intimidated by that, but I SWEAR, there is not a single one out there who won’t appreciate just a “EASODIFADNAD I LOVE THIS”. But you can just say what you liked, what stayed with you after you finished. A quote, a character trait, if the characters were in voice, how you’d always wanted to see that particular plot. I know I’m terrible with this, I just can’t think of the words, but it’s not a checklist of compliments you need to go through, just think of how you’d describe it to a friend if you were recommending it.

It really, really makes a difference.

mayahansens:

(Source: aplacethatdoesntknowmyname)

it was

enchanting

to meet you

E